MILITARY/VETERANS

MILITARY/VETERANS

MILITARY/VETERANS

For nearly three decades, I proudly served my nation in the United State Army. If a uniform covered with combat and service medals and ribbons means anything, it’s the knowledge and wisdom that soldiers—the men and women who dedicate their lives to keeping America safe—value family and predictability.
When I retired from the military, I walked away knowing one thing above all: soldiers are our greatest resource. Not ships, not tanks, not aircraft. I am PRO Military—but more importantly, I am PRO Soldier. You might ask, what is the difference between being pro-military and pro-soldier?
To me, it is a disgrace when, time after time, members of Congress willingly and callously support the deployment of our brothers and sisters in arms without regard to the consequences. These same self-serving politicians who parade atop tanks but who have never known a single day of combat—consistently over-deploy military personnel yet have no problem voting against veteran benefits and active service member needs. Sometimes the call arises for our military to fight and serve. When Congress sends our soldiers to battle, Congress should damn well make sure that our troops and their families have the best possible resources to serve valiantly and to reestablish their post-service lives, immediately and well into the future. But active military members, veterans, and non-service voters all know that during Joe Wilson’s two-decade tenure in Congress, for all his military lip service and tank-parading, he hasn’t provided our brothers and sisters in arms with the resources they so desperately deserve and need.
Our military exist for two reasons. The first is to deter war. The second is to fight and achieve a favorable outcome for us and our allies. The U.S. military has no equal, and it is important that we continue to build and use our military strength to help stabilize an ever-fragile international community. But we must not throw all our eggs in the military basket. International diplomacy must continue to be a forward face of American and allied efforts to maintain peace and promote democracy.
As the Congressman for South Carolina’s Second Congressional District, I will always look after the well-being of our military service folks and their families by ensuring maximum diplomacy is rendered prior to committing our troops to battle.
My commitment to our troops, to our national security, to maintaining international peace, is not just as a combat veteran and 28-year serviceman. It is also as the father of a child who has made a commitment to serve his nation as a soldier. At the end of the day, medals and ribbons mean nothing—what matters is knowing that our sons and daughters, our spouses, our fathers and mothers, our neighbors, serve for all the right reasons, and will have their needs met, now, and ever in the future.